How do you begin to talk about the Gorillaz? Is it a cartoon band? Or is it a band that happens to be animated?  Is it a side project for Damon Albarn? Or has it turned out to be his true outlet for creativity? You know what? Who cares. If you really want to know all the background information about Damon Albarn and his group of misfits feel free to exit out this blog and find the nearest wikipedia page. Otherwise, I’m hear to talk about the music and my feelings on the imagery of their newest album Plastic Beach.

I missed the first album. My b. I never heard “Clint Eastwood” and years later, never really cared for the track. My true introduction began in 2005 in the form of “Feel Good Inc.” and the dirty bass line that accompanied it. The ying yang effect of the “Feel Good Inc.” got me prepared for my favorite track from Demon Days “Dare”.

But nothing from Demon Days would prepare me for Plastic Beach.


The Gorillaz was always a novelty band before their latest album. They made great singles, but I wouldn’t care about taking a closer listen to any of their B-sides. What was the point? The funny thing about Plastic Beach was I had the reverse intentions. I didn’t and still don’t care much for their first single “Stylo”, but I absolutely love the album.

The term Plastic Beach refers not only refers to the current state of environmental buffoonery that surrounds our world, but also to the assortment of “collectible items” that the Gorillaz plucked from the beach to use on their album. Artists featured on this album are unique in their own sense. They’re not necessarily washed-up or unheard of, but most have seen better days in terms of creativity and notoriety. Regardless, the Gorillaz were able to bring them together to let them shine, in their own right.

The opener begins with the hum of shoreline before transforming into full on “Orchestral Intro”. Then Snoop Dogg takes the reigns to introduces us to the “Plastic Beach”! After this point, the album gets fun. In”White Flag”, the most amazing intro and outro known to man is produced for a track that in theory should never go together, but somehow they do.

The beginning of “Superfast Jellyfish” sounds like a Saturday morning cartoon cereal commercial, promising a piping hot breakfast in less than 3 minutes. Behind the fun intro and upbeat vibe there is an underlying context of out of control consumerism, which is the main theme of Plastic Beach.

Waste. Waste. Waste. What’s the point of it all. It may make you feel good for those precious 3 minutes, but think of the effect that you’re having on the world. Is it truly worth it? If not, be prepared to spend the rest of your vacation at this beautiful plastic beach resort.

Plastic Beach: B+

Download:Gorillaz- \”White Flag\”

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